Ramcharan-Crowley

Walter Dietsch1386

Name
Walter Dietsch
Given names
Walter
Surname
Dietsch
Birth 1386
Birth of a son
#1
? “Dietsch the Gardener” Dietsch
1419 (Age 33 years)
Note: The Bianco genealogy lists this date as c. 1440
Birth of a grandson
#1
Henry Dietsch
1468 (Age 82 years)

Residence
Address: (the house of his father) next to St. Katherine's Church next to Siegfried Koltzneckt along the quay
Note: vischer stade-alongside the quay..There is a river that is crossing Colmar..The house of Walther D.was located alongside this river.
ResidenceChronicle: The Grussenheim Papers, Corrections to the English Translation
SourceGénéalogie d'Hélène et Thierry Bianco
Publication: The Hélène and Thierry Bianco Genealogy website http://perso.wanadoo.fr/thierry.bianco/ Notre généalogie qui contient environ 20000 fiches concernant essentiellement la Provence et les Alpes du Sud, la région de Damery dans la Marne et celle de Grussenheim dans le Haut-Rhin. Nous effectuons des relevés systématiques car nous considérons que l'entraide et la mise en commun des données et des talents de chacun ( connaissance des lieux et des patronymes, histoire locale, paléographie, intuition...) sont les seuls moyens de constituer des généalogies aussi larges que possibles. thierrybianco@wanadoo.fr
SourceChronicle: The Grussenheim Papers, English Translation
Citation details: page 1
Text:
1386 Walter Dietsch of same house in the town, in the large lane beside his sister-in-law.²


Note:
Introductory letter from Marg Saunders: Alice Mosley Siedelman and Barbara Mosley Peck have been working for over twenty years researching our family's history. A few others have joined with them, but the bulk of the work and time has been theirs. Recently Janet Fries of Bloomington received some very interesting papers and she passed them on to Barb and Alice. These papers are 12½ single spaced, typewritten pages. They were compiled by Abbe Raymond Seeman of Grussenheim, France. This is a part of his ongoing search for the descendants of the villagers of Grussenheim. There was only one problem with these papers. They were written in medieval and modern French and German. We tried, unsuccessfully, to find someone who would translate the papers for us. Being stubborn and naive, I decided to translate the papers myself. I was fully immerged and in eminant danger of being fully submerged, when a good friend came to my rescue. Inga Kremeyer is a well educated lady who speaks German and French. She was raised in Germany and has a good understanding of German-French history. After I had researched each word, and listed all the possible meanings, Inga and I would place ourselves mentally into the historical time frame and then Inga would translate. As she read, I would check the words against my research and sometimes I was able to correlate English words or terms that eluded Inga. There is one word that we were unable to translate: SIGRESTEN. If you know the meaning, please let us know.* I have placed this document in notebook form so that it can be expanded. When we have more information we will share it. At the end of the papers you will find a form that you can use for your own family history sheet. - I have used slash marks (/) to separate my own comments from the main body of the translations. I hope these comments and explanations will clarify the more confused parts of the papers. You will also note that the European method of dating has been used. Example: 29.5.1856, 29th of May, 1856 — day/month/year. If you can add anything to our information about our family, we would like to hear from you. ------ *As we go to the printer's, we have found the meaning of the word "Sigresten". It is of Swiss dialect, a sacristan, an officer in church entrusted with the care of the sacristy, a sexton.
Note: The footnotes in the pdf version of the document refer to the "Corrections to the Translation of the Grussenheim Papers" by Abbe Raymond Seemann. You can find that document in the Mulitmedia Object section below.
SourceChronicle: The Grussenheim Papers, Corrections to the English Translation
Citation details: page I
Text:
² I386 Sister in law is wrong: Sweigerin is a family name.When it's a man. the spelling is SWEIGER...when it's a wife...it's SWEIGERIN At this tine a wife of your family tree wae a DIETSCHIN In later times the "in" at the end of the word disappe a red. visc her stade-alongside the quay..There is a river that is crossing Colmar..The house of Walther D.was located alongside this river.
Note:
These are Abbe Raymond Seemann's corrections to The Translation of the Grussenheim Papers, referenced in footnote form. You can find the Grussenheim Papers here: http://gene.crowley.cx/source.php?sid=S322
SourceChronicle: The Grussenheim Papers, English Translation
Citation details: page 49: Direct Lineage of Margaret Keiner Saunders
Text:
WALTER DIETSCH of Colmar (1st M) 1386


Note:
Introductory letter from Marg Saunders: Alice Mosley Siedelman and Barbara Mosley Peck have been working for over twenty years researching our family's history. A few others have joined with them, but the bulk of the work and time has been theirs. Recently Janet Fries of Bloomington received some very interesting papers and she passed them on to Barb and Alice. These papers are 12½ single spaced, typewritten pages. They were compiled by Abbe Raymond Seeman of Grussenheim, France. This is a part of his ongoing search for the descendants of the villagers of Grussenheim. There was only one problem with these papers. They were written in medieval and modern French and German. We tried, unsuccessfully, to find someone who would translate the papers for us. Being stubborn and naive, I decided to translate the papers myself. I was fully immerged and in eminant danger of being fully submerged, when a good friend came to my rescue. Inga Kremeyer is a well educated lady who speaks German and French. She was raised in Germany and has a good understanding of German-French history. After I had researched each word, and listed all the possible meanings, Inga and I would place ourselves mentally into the historical time frame and then Inga would translate. As she read, I would check the words against my research and sometimes I was able to correlate English words or terms that eluded Inga. There is one word that we were unable to translate: SIGRESTEN. If you know the meaning, please let us know.* I have placed this document in notebook form so that it can be expanded. When we have more information we will share it. At the end of the papers you will find a form that you can use for your own family history sheet. - I have used slash marks (/) to separate my own comments from the main body of the translations. I hope these comments and explanations will clarify the more confused parts of the papers. You will also note that the European method of dating has been used. Example: 29.5.1856, 29th of May, 1856 — day/month/year. If you can add anything to our information about our family, we would like to hear from you. ------ *As we go to the printer's, we have found the meaning of the word "Sigresten". It is of Swiss dialect, a sacristan, an officer in church entrusted with the care of the sacristy, a sexton.
Note: The footnotes in the pdf version of the document refer to the "Corrections to the Translation of the Grussenheim Papers" by Abbe Raymond Seemann. You can find that document in the Mulitmedia Object section below.
Residence
vischer stade-alongside the quay..There is a river that is crossing Colmar..The house of Walther D.was located alongside this river.