Ramcharan-Crowley

1617 document from Grussenheim

Georg DietschAge: 36 years16141650

Name
Georg Dietsch
Given names
Georg
Surname
Dietsch

Georges Dietsch

Name
Georges Dietsch
Given names
Georges
Surname
Dietsch
Publication: The Hélène and Thierry Bianco Genealogy website http://perso.wanadoo.fr/thierry.bianco/ Notre généalogie qui contient environ 20000 fiches concernant essentiellement la Provence et les Alpes du Sud, la région de Damery dans la Marne et celle de Grussenheim dans le Haut-Rhin. Nous effectuons des relevés systématiques car nous considérons que l'entraide et la mise en commun des données et des talents de chacun ( connaissance des lieux et des patronymes, histoire locale, paléographie, intuition...) sont les seuls moyens de constituer des généalogies aussi larges que possibles. thierrybianco@wanadoo.fr
Birth 1614 44

Birth of a son
#1
George Dietsch
1650 (on the date of death)
Occupation
Miller

Death 1650 (Age 36 years)

NameChronicle: The Grussenheim Papers, English Translation
NameGénéalogie d'Hélène et Thierry Bianco
Publication: The Hélène and Thierry Bianco Genealogy website http://perso.wanadoo.fr/thierry.bianco/ Notre généalogie qui contient environ 20000 fiches concernant essentiellement la Provence et les Alpes du Sud, la région de Damery dans la Marne et celle de Grussenheim dans le Haut-Rhin. Nous effectuons des relevés systématiques car nous considérons que l'entraide et la mise en commun des données et des talents de chacun ( connaissance des lieux et des patronymes, histoire locale, paléographie, intuition...) sont les seuls moyens de constituer des généalogies aussi larges que possibles. thierrybianco@wanadoo.fr
DeathChronicle: The Grussenheim Papers, English Translation
SourceGénéalogie d'Hélène et Thierry Bianco
Publication: The Hélène and Thierry Bianco Genealogy website http://perso.wanadoo.fr/thierry.bianco/ Notre généalogie qui contient environ 20000 fiches concernant essentiellement la Provence et les Alpes du Sud, la région de Damery dans la Marne et celle de Grussenheim dans le Haut-Rhin. Nous effectuons des relevés systématiques car nous considérons que l'entraide et la mise en commun des données et des talents de chacun ( connaissance des lieux et des patronymes, histoire locale, paléographie, intuition...) sont les seuls moyens de constituer des généalogies aussi larges que possibles. thierrybianco@wanadoo.fr
SourceChronicle: The Grussenheim Papers, English Translation
Text:
GEORG DIETSCH, Miller of Grussenheim (1st M) l6l4


Note:
Introductory letter from Marg Saunders: Alice Mosley Siedelman and Barbara Mosley Peck have been working for over twenty years researching our family's history. A few others have joined with them, but the bulk of the work and time has been theirs. Recently Janet Fries of Bloomington received some very interesting papers and she passed them on to Barb and Alice. These papers are 12½ single spaced, typewritten pages. They were compiled by Abbe Raymond Seeman of Grussenheim, France. This is a part of his ongoing search for the descendants of the villagers of Grussenheim. There was only one problem with these papers. They were written in medieval and modern French and German. We tried, unsuccessfully, to find someone who would translate the papers for us. Being stubborn and naive, I decided to translate the papers myself. I was fully immerged and in eminant danger of being fully submerged, when a good friend came to my rescue. Inga Kremeyer is a well educated lady who speaks German and French. She was raised in Germany and has a good understanding of German-French history. After I had researched each word, and listed all the possible meanings, Inga and I would place ourselves mentally into the historical time frame and then Inga would translate. As she read, I would check the words against my research and sometimes I was able to correlate English words or terms that eluded Inga. There is one word that we were unable to translate: SIGRESTEN. If you know the meaning, please let us know.* I have placed this document in notebook form so that it can be expanded. When we have more information we will share it. At the end of the papers you will find a form that you can use for your own family history sheet. - I have used slash marks (/) to separate my own comments from the main body of the translations. I hope these comments and explanations will clarify the more confused parts of the papers. You will also note that the European method of dating has been used. Example: 29.5.1856, 29th of May, 1856 — day/month/year. If you can add anything to our information about our family, we would like to hear from you. ------ *As we go to the printer's, we have found the meaning of the word "Sigresten". It is of Swiss dialect, a sacristan, an officer in church entrusted with the care of the sacristy, a sexton.
Note: The footnotes in the pdf version of the document refer to the "Corrections to the Translation of the Grussenheim Papers" by Abbe Raymond Seemann. You can find that document in the Mulitmedia Object section below.
SourceChronicle: The Grussenheim Papers, English Translation
Citation details: pages 3 and 4
Text:
GEORGE DIETSCH THE SON OF HANS DIETSCH He managed the mill as had his father, he went into farming also. He owed, in the year 1614, to the Church Factory: 2 viertel rye and 2 viertel barley. In the. year 1617, he owed three days work of reed mats from the lower reeds and he owed a half days work of reed mats made from the Elwen reed of the Linden, Colmar area. Item: near Ill[F5] from the Robrich next to Rhine of the ditch site... the lower side next to Beatus Seilers, from Schlettstadt, heirs; the upper side near Georg Bantzen from Jebsheim...(he owed) 1 Livre and several Rappen. In the year 1617 George Dietsch borrowed 50 Livre principal from Andreae Apostoli.[F6] According to letters of the last of November in l6l0... so and so much money of this is owed to the Priest, the Sigristen and the Schoolmaster. [Sigresten is a job title we have not discovered the meaning of the word as of yet. Possibly it is a tax officer or village recorder*] 1621 George's name again appears in the "Invoice of the Holy People" entries.[F7] After that there is no more reference in the records until after the "Thirty Years War", George Dietsch had to witness the atrocities of the war. Peter Van Mansfield's mercenaries and the Swedish mercenaries of King Gustovus Adolphus have plundered and burned his mill. He and his family had to flee and take shelter in the fortified towns in the surroundings over in the Voges Mountain's woods. After this hard trial of that sorrowful time, he went back to settle in his village. About the middle of the century (165O) he died. --- * As we go to the printer's, we have found the meaning of the word "Sigresten". It is of Swiss dialect, a sacristan, an officer in church entrusted with the care of the sacristy, a sexton.
1617 document from Grussenheim
1617 document from Grussenheim

Note: The note on this document says "1617," but the text of the Grussenheim Papers only mentions the date "1614." Could one of these dates be incorrect?



Note:
Introductory letter from Marg Saunders: Alice Mosley Siedelman and Barbara Mosley Peck have been working for over twenty years researching our family's history. A few others have joined with them, but the bulk of the work and time has been theirs. Recently Janet Fries of Bloomington received some very interesting papers and she passed them on to Barb and Alice. These papers are 12½ single spaced, typewritten pages. They were compiled by Abbe Raymond Seeman of Grussenheim, France. This is a part of his ongoing search for the descendants of the villagers of Grussenheim. There was only one problem with these papers. They were written in medieval and modern French and German. We tried, unsuccessfully, to find someone who would translate the papers for us. Being stubborn and naive, I decided to translate the papers myself. I was fully immerged and in eminant danger of being fully submerged, when a good friend came to my rescue. Inga Kremeyer is a well educated lady who speaks German and French. She was raised in Germany and has a good understanding of German-French history. After I had researched each word, and listed all the possible meanings, Inga and I would place ourselves mentally into the historical time frame and then Inga would translate. As she read, I would check the words against my research and sometimes I was able to correlate English words or terms that eluded Inga. There is one word that we were unable to translate: SIGRESTEN. If you know the meaning, please let us know.* I have placed this document in notebook form so that it can be expanded. When we have more information we will share it. At the end of the papers you will find a form that you can use for your own family history sheet. - I have used slash marks (/) to separate my own comments from the main body of the translations. I hope these comments and explanations will clarify the more confused parts of the papers. You will also note that the European method of dating has been used. Example: 29.5.1856, 29th of May, 1856 — day/month/year. If you can add anything to our information about our family, we would like to hear from you. ------ *As we go to the printer's, we have found the meaning of the word "Sigresten". It is of Swiss dialect, a sacristan, an officer in church entrusted with the care of the sacristy, a sexton.
Note: The footnotes in the pdf version of the document refer to the "Corrections to the Translation of the Grussenheim Papers" by Abbe Raymond Seemann. You can find that document in the Mulitmedia Object section below.
SourceChronicle: The Grussenheim Papers, Corrections to the English Translation
Citation details: page I
Text:
[F5] Item near Ill from the Rohrich..(the Ill is an affluent of the Rhine ..and the Rohrich is an affluent of the Ill). [F6] From Andreae Apostoli(that's the 30 of Nov.the feast of the Saint.) 1621 George's name again appears in the Book Keeping lists of the Church Factory.. [F7] 1621 George's name again appears in the Book Keeping lists of the Church Factory..
Note:
These are Abbe Raymond Seemann's corrections to The Translation of the Grussenheim Papers, referenced in footnote form. You can find the Grussenheim Papers here: http://gene.crowley.cx/source.php?sid=S322
SourceChronicle: The Grussenheim Papers, English Translation
Citation details: Page 49: Direct Lineage of Margaret Keiner Saunders
Text:
GEORG DIETSCH, Miller of Grussenheim (1st M) l6l4 son Georg


Note:
Introductory letter from Marg Saunders: Alice Mosley Siedelman and Barbara Mosley Peck have been working for over twenty years researching our family's history. A few others have joined with them, but the bulk of the work and time has been theirs. Recently Janet Fries of Bloomington received some very interesting papers and she passed them on to Barb and Alice. These papers are 12½ single spaced, typewritten pages. They were compiled by Abbe Raymond Seeman of Grussenheim, France. This is a part of his ongoing search for the descendants of the villagers of Grussenheim. There was only one problem with these papers. They were written in medieval and modern French and German. We tried, unsuccessfully, to find someone who would translate the papers for us. Being stubborn and naive, I decided to translate the papers myself. I was fully immerged and in eminant danger of being fully submerged, when a good friend came to my rescue. Inga Kremeyer is a well educated lady who speaks German and French. She was raised in Germany and has a good understanding of German-French history. After I had researched each word, and listed all the possible meanings, Inga and I would place ourselves mentally into the historical time frame and then Inga would translate. As she read, I would check the words against my research and sometimes I was able to correlate English words or terms that eluded Inga. There is one word that we were unable to translate: SIGRESTEN. If you know the meaning, please let us know.* I have placed this document in notebook form so that it can be expanded. When we have more information we will share it. At the end of the papers you will find a form that you can use for your own family history sheet. - I have used slash marks (/) to separate my own comments from the main body of the translations. I hope these comments and explanations will clarify the more confused parts of the papers. You will also note that the European method of dating has been used. Example: 29.5.1856, 29th of May, 1856 — day/month/year. If you can add anything to our information about our family, we would like to hear from you. ------ *As we go to the printer's, we have found the meaning of the word "Sigresten". It is of Swiss dialect, a sacristan, an officer in church entrusted with the care of the sacristy, a sexton.
Note: The footnotes in the pdf version of the document refer to the "Corrections to the Translation of the Grussenheim Papers" by Abbe Raymond Seemann. You can find that document in the Mulitmedia Object section below.
Source1617 document from Grussenheim1617 document from Grussenheim
Format: image/jpeg
Image dimensions: 800 × 946 pixels
File size: 286 KB
Type: Document
Highlighted image: yes
Note: The note on this document says "1617," but the text of the Grussenheim Papers only mentions the date "1614." Could one of these dates be incorrect?